INFINITE POSSIBILITY

TEAM: David Schurman, Elizabeth Austin, Ethan Mok, Linda Park

            Malcolm MacDougall, Jennifer Casasanto

ROLE: Lead Project Manager, Designer

TECHNOLOGY: Fusion 360, solar modeling

COVERAGE:

Installation

Dedication

"Infinite Possibility" is a joint effort between Brown STEAM and the Brown School of Engineering to create a permanent time-telling installation for Brown's Engineering Research Center. On behalf of Charles Giancarlo, we lead a student design team through ideation and concept iterations until the final sculpture was approved by Mr. Giancarlo, the School of Engineering, and the Brown Public Arts Committee: a noon mark sundial mobius strip. In the later stages of the project, I have coordinated testing of the solar mechanism, communication between the University and fabrication contractors, and financial and budgeting considerations. 

The sculpture was installed and dedicated in May 2019.

Our team visited Sultz Fabrication in December, where we were able to see the full outer frame positioned and tack-welded.

They were even kind enough to let me perform one of the welds!

Image credit: Malcolm MacDougall // Sultz Fabrication

NOON MARK SUNDIAL

A noon mark is a form of sundial that indicates high noon and current progression of the year every day. It consists of an aperture suspended above an analemma: the path through which the sun circulates in the sky throughout each year. Based on the Earth's tilt and rotation, it appears as though the sun's location in the sky travels along an infinity-like path throughout the year.

We have calculated the sun's unique "path" at noon based on the location of the sculpture, and projected that path onto the curvature of the mobius strip. As a result, every day at noon, the light filtering through the aperture in the strip will cross the analemma path at a point unique to the current time of year. 

 

We wanted to explore the interplay of the mobius strip's shape with that of Brown's unique analemma path to make a sculpture personalized to the location it will inhabit for, hopefully, up to a century. 

© 2020 by David Schurman